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How to Obtain a Free Credit Report for a Loan

by Julia Thomas
  • Overview

    It's important to review your credit report when applying for a loan. If there is inaccurate information in your report, you need to correct it before submitting your loan application. Incorrect information on your credit report can lower your credit score and cause a bank to deny your loan application. Many companies charge fees to provide credit reports---either in the form of a one-time payment or an ongoing membership. However, thanks to the Fair Credit Reporting Act, you are entitled to a free credit report every 12 months.
 
  • Step 1

    Visit AnnualCreditReport.com. This is the only site authorized by the Federal Trade Commission to provide consumers with a free yearly credit report. You can submit your credit report request online.
  • Step 2

    Call 1-877-322-8228 if you would prefer not to submit your request online. You also can download a request form at the Federal Trade Commission website and mail it to: Annual Credit Report Request Service PO Box 105281 Atlanta, GA 30348-5281
  • Step 3

    Notify the credit reporting companies (Experian, TransUnion and Equifax) in writing if you spot inaccurate information in your credit report. Send your letter, along with copies of supporting documentation, via certified mail.
  • 2
  • Your Social Security number
  • Your Social Security number
  • Keep your credit reports in a safe place for future reference. You will receive a report from each of the three nationwide credit reporting companies: Experian, TransUnion and Equifax.
  • Keep your credit reports in a safe place for future reference. You will receive a report from each of the three nationwide credit reporting companies: Experian, TransUnion and Equifax.
  • Be on the alert for companies promising "free" credit reports that aren't really free. Some of these companies try to get you to sign up for long-term credit monitoring services.
  • Be on the alert for companies promising "free" credit reports that aren't really free. Some of these companies try to get you to sign up for long-term credit monitoring services.
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References & Resources