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How to File Wisconsin Income Taxes

by Kimberly Best
  • Overview

    You can file your income taxes in Wisconsin by mail or online. The Wisconsin Department of Revenue has set up a system whereby you can fill out your personal income tax form and submit it online for free. Alternatively, you can print out the personal income tax form and submit it by mail.
    Wisconsin income taxes can be filed by mail or online for free.
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  • Step 1

    Determine if you can file your income taxes online. The Wisconsin Department of Revenue website allows individual taxpayers to file their taxes online unless you (1) are claiming certain tax credits, (2) are filing a Schedule H with a number of supporting documents, (3) have nine or more W-2's or 1099s, (4) have a fiscal year ending on a date other than Dec. 31, (5) are claiming more than 19 exemptions or (6) have no Social Security number or taxpayer identification number.
  • Step 2

    Select which forms you will need to file. Open each of the forms you choose in Adobe Reader and complete the required fields. If you do not complete all the work at once, save the forms for later mailing or submission to the Wisconsin Department of Revenue e-filing system. To fill out the Form 1 (the basic form or Wisconsin equivalent to a 1040), you will need your completed federal income tax form.
  • Step 3

    Enter the details of your W-2's into the forms if you are e-filing. If you mail in your return, you must attach a copy of each W-2 you received for the taxable year. You are not required to submit paper copies of your W-2's if you are e-filing, but you must follow up an e-file within 48 hours with a paper copy of your homestead credit if you are claiming one. If you are submitting a Form 1, the system will request you upload a complete copy of your federal tax return when you e-file.
  • Step 4

    Press "Submit return" to electronically submit any form you have filled out to the Wisconsin Department of Revenue. If you prefer to mail in your return, print the forms when complete. If you are due a refund and are mailing your return, submit your return to the Wisconsin Department of Revenue at: P.O. Box 59 Madison, WI 53785-0001 If you have taxes due and are mailing your return, submit your return to the Wisconsin Department of Revenue at: P.O. Box 268 Madison, WI 53790-0001 If you are claiming a homestead credit and are mailing your return, submit your return to the Wisconsin Department of Revenue at: P.O. Box 34 Madison, WI 53786-0001
  • Step 5

    Enter your payment or refund options at the end of your Wisconsin return. You may pay by direct debit or withdrawal, by credit card, or by check or money order. If you are due a refund, enter your checking account number and routing number to receive your refund within days.
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  • Complete copy of federal income tax return Adobe Reader 9.0 or above All your W-2 and 1099 forms Your checking account and routing number (optional, for receipt of refund or payment of balance due) A credit card (optional, for payment of balance due) Printer (recommended)
  • Complete copy of federal income tax return
  • Adobe Reader 9.0 or above
  • All your W-2 and 1099 forms
  • Your checking account and routing number (optional, for receipt of refund or payment of balance due)
  • A credit card (optional, for payment of balance due)
  • Printer (recommended)
  • If you are using an accountant, the accountant can electronically file your federal and Wisconsin income taxes at the same time.
  • If you are using an accountant, the accountant can electronically file your federal and Wisconsin income taxes at the same time.
  • This article is meant to give an overview of the tax filing options in Wisconsin. It is in no way a substitute for the advice of a qualified professional such as a certified public accountant or tax attorney licensed in Wisconsin.
  • This article is meant to give an overview of the tax filing options in Wisconsin. It is in no way a substitute for the advice of a qualified professional such as a certified public accountant or tax attorney licensed in Wisconsin.
  • WIWisconsinUSUnited States

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